Rootkits: Subverting the Windows Kernel

Written by Greg Hoglund

A brilliantly written book on everything one would want to know about Rootkits in the Microsoft Windows world. Greg is the industry expert who shares his knowledge through many examples and illustrations that would help almost any level of reader grasp a better understanding of Rootkits. The authors start with `Understanding Attackers' Motives' and what Rootkits are and aren't, and work they way through Rootkit designs, hardware interaction, hooking into kernel and user, `Direct Kernel Object Manipulation', `Hardware Manipulation', covert techniques and ways to identify Rootkits on your systems. The authors in-depth knowledge of Rootkits is clearly demonstrated early on when they walk through creating a loadable module, or device/kernel driver. Through this process, they take the time to explain each line, how it manipulates the system, and how it could be used maliciously. Throughout most of the book, the authors give very detailed examples, lines of code and other evidence supporting the theories and processes presented here. The book is written in a way that they leave little to the imagination and provide hard evidence to support the thought. The book ends with Rootkit detection, which is the only way to end a book on malicious software. Now that they have taught one how to manipulate and hijack system, here is what one can do to protect the systems they are responsible for, and identify these malicious codes on ones systems. They describe scanning memory, identifying different types of hooks, and again provide some code for one to use to help with these processes. After reading this book, not only will one have the understanding of Rootkits are and how they can be used, one will have enough knowledge to create their own Rootkits, understand key programming techniques such as runtime patching, hooking into the kernel, and remote command and control. I highly recommend this book as the Rootkit is the `Mother of all Malicious Code'. Once an attacker has successfully installed a Rootkit on one's system, the game is over.

Rootkits: Subverting the Windows Kernel

Rate this article: 
Average: 5 (1 vote)